100 Books to Reread

Oscar Wilde once said, “If one cannot enjoy reading a book over and over again, there is no use in reading it at all.” The process of rereading often allows us an opportunity to notice aspects of the book that escaped our attention during the first read, while reminding us what made us love it the first time. With that in mind, we’ve compiled a list of books that beg to be reread. From Pauline Kael’s electrifying film essays in I Lost it at the Movies to the laugh-out-loud antics of Gary Shteyngart’s The Russian Debutante’s Handbook, these books will leave you asking for seconds and thirds.

see the list from the New York Public Library

10 Graphic Novels You Need to Read This Summer

If you’ve been meaning to put a dent in your graphic novel reading list, summer is the perfect time to do it. You’re less likely to be judgmentally side-eyed from people on the train who wonder why you’re reading a comic book, and the lighter volumes will be less bulky in your beach bag.

get the list here from Mashable

July’s Top 10 books picked by Librarians across the country

 

 

 

 

 

New York Times Best Sellers at ACLS for June 29, 2014

Get the latest NYT Best Sellers at the Allegany County Library System.

FICTION (Combined Print & E-Book)

TOP SECRET TWENTY-ONEby Janet Evanovich. (Bantam.) The New Jersey bounty hunter Stephanie Plum pursues a dealer who sells more than used cars.

THE SILKWORMby Robert Galbraith. (Mulholland/Little, Brown.) The private detective Cormoran Strike steps in when the author of a roman à clef set in literary London is murdered; by J. K. Rowling, writing pseudonymously.

ALL FALL DOWNby Jennifer Weiner. (Atria.) A woman becomes addicted to pain medication.

MR. MERCEDES, by Stephen King. (Scribner.) A driver plows into a crowd at a job fair, killing eight. The killer then taunts a suicidal ex-cop, who must stop a deadlier attack.

WRITTEN IN MY OWN HEART’S BLOODby Diana Gabaldon. (Delacorte.) In the eighth Outlander time-traveling romance, Jamie Fraser and his family face challenges in the 18th and 20th centuries.

THE GOLDFINCH, by Donna Tartt. (Little, Brown.) A painting smuggled out of the Metropolitan Museum of Art after a bombing becomes a boy’s prize, guilt and burden.

GONE GIRLby Gillian Flynn. (Crown.) A woman disappears on the day of her fifth anniversary; is her husband a killer?

 SHATTEREDby Kevin Hearne. (Del Rey.) Atticus O’Sullivan is no longer the only Druid to walk the earth; part of the Iron Druid Chronicles series.

A GAME OF THRONES, by George R. R. Martin. (Bantam.) In the frozen wastes to the north of Winterfell, sinister and supernatural forces are mustering.

ORPHAN TRAINby Christina Baker Kline. (Morrow/HarperCollins.) A historical novel about orphans swept off the streets of New York and sent to the Midwest in the 1920s.

 

NONFICTION (Combined Print & E-Book)

HARD CHOICESby Hillary Rodham Clinton. (Simon & Schuster.) Clinton’s memoir focuses on her years as secretary of state and her views on America’s role in the world.

ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACKby Piper Kerman. (Spiegel & Grau.) A Brooklyn woman’s prison memoir. The basis for the Netflix series, originally published in 2010.

MEby Katharine Hepburn. (Ballantine.) A memoir by the actress, first published in 1991.

THE BOYS IN THE BOATby Daniel James Brown. (Viking.) The University of Washington’s eight-oar crew and their quest for gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics.

UNBROKEN, by Laura Hillenbrand. (Random House.) An Olympic runner’s story of survival as a prisoner of the Japanese in World War II.

HEAVEN IS FOR REAL, by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent. (Thomas Nelson.) A father recounts his 3-year-old son’s encounter with Jesus during an appendectomy.

ONE NATION, by Ben Carson with Candy Carson. (Sentinel.) Carson, a retired pediatric neurosurgeon, now a Fox News contributor, offers solutions to problems in health and education based on capitalism, not government.

LONE SURVIVOR, by Marcus Luttrell and Patrick Robinson. (Little, Brown.) The only survivor of a Navy SEALs operation in northern Afghanistan describes the battle and his escape. First published in 2007; the basis for the movie.

THINK LIKE A FREAK, by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner. (Morrow/HarperCollins.) How to solve problems creatively, from the authors of “Freakonomics.

CAPITAL IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY, by Thomas Piketty. (Belknap/Harvard University.) An analysis of centuries of economic history predicts worsening inequality.

 

25 Books Guaranteed to Make You Laugh

Not to get too philosophical, but it’s hard to define what is truly funny. Is it something that has you falling on the floor laughing or something that has you chuckling inside while also pondering the absurdity of the human condition?

get laughing or giggling here 

The 8 Best Siblings in Fiction

Whether you love them or want to throw them out the window, there’s no denying siblings are a nonstop story parade. In multi-child families, siblings are our formative rivals, allies, bosses, confidantes, and defenders, so it’s hardly a surprise that brothers and sisters play such a central role in storytelling, dating all the way back to the earliest recorded myths. Here are some of our favorite sibling dynamics in literature, which run the gamut from lifelong friends to bitter enemies.

get the article

10 Irresistible Books About Juicy Scandals

A scandal is a thrilling topic for a book. It is the story of people with goals, grasping for something just out of their reach — and whether they get it or not, when the story reaches the public eye, they’re judged and put under glass.

get the dirt here 

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