New York Times Best Sellers at ACLS for February 7, 2016

Get the latest NYT Best Sellers at the Allegany County Library System.

FICTION (Combined Print & E-Book)

NYPD RED 4, by James Patterson and Marshall Karp. (Little, Brown.) Detective Zach Gordon and his partner, members of an elite task force that protects the rich and famous, pursue a cold-blooded killer.

SPIDER GAME, by Christine Feehan. (Jove.) Trap shares his sidekick’s desire for getting even.

THE BANDS OF MOURNING, by Brandon Sanderson. (Tor/Tom Doherty.) A sequel to “Shadows of Self”; a Mistborn novel.

THE CHOICE, by Nicholas Sparks. (Grand Central.) When Travis meets his new neighbor, his bachelor status erodes.

MY NAME IS LUCY BARTON, by Elizabeth Strout. (Random House.) A woman struggles with memories of her impoverished and disturbing childhood and its effect on the present as she attempts to reconcile with her mother.

BLUE, by Danielle Steel. (Delacorte.) A woman whose life has been shattered befriends a homeless boy.

THE NIGHTINGALE, by Kristin Hannah. (St. Martin’s.) Two sisters are separated in World War II France: one in the countryside, the other in Paris.

THE LAST ANNIVERSARY, by Liane Moriarty. (Harper Perennial.) A family home on an Australian island is bequeathed to an outsider, and the clan’s conflicts come with it.

THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN, by Paula Hawkins. (Riverhead.) A psychological thriller set in the environs of London is full of complications and betrayals.

THE REVENANT, by Michael Punke. (Picador.) Left for dead after a mauling, the master tracker Hugh Glass is consumed by a singular desire for revenge; an inspiration for the 2015 film.

 

NONFICTION (Combined Print & E-Book)

WHEN BREATH BECOMES AIR, by Paul Kalanithi. (Random House.) A memoir by a physician who received a diagnosis of Stage IV lung cancer at the age of 36.

13 HOURSby Mitchell Zuckoff with members of the Annex Security Team. (Twelve.) Six C.I.A. contract employees discuss their experience during the attack on the State Department compound and the C.I.A. station called the “annex” in Benghazi in 2012.

DARK MONEY, by Jane Mayer. (Doubleday.) An account of how the Koch brothers and other super-wealthy donors deployed their money to change American politics.

BETWEEN THE WORLD AND ME, by Ta-Nehisi Coates. (Spiegel & Grau.) A meditation on race in America as well as a personal story by the Atlantic’s national correspondent.

THE ROAD TO LITTLE DRIBBLING, by Bill Bryson. (Doubleday.) An American expatriate travels around his adopted country.

THE BIG SHORT, by Michael Lewis. (Norton.) The people who saw the real estate crash coming and made billions from their foresight. The basis of the movie.

THE NAME OF GOD IS MERCY, by Pope Francis with Andrea Tornielli. (Random House.) In a conversation with a Vatican reporter, the pontiff explores the cornerstone of his faith.

THIS TIME TOGETHER, by Carol Burnett. (Crown Archetype.) The comedian describes her rise in show business and the people she’s met along the way. Originally published in 2010.

THE BOYS IN THE BOATby Daniel James Brown. (Penguin.) The University of Washington’s eight-oar crew and their quest for gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics.

THOMAS JEFFERSON AND THE TRIPOLI PIRATESby Brian Kilmeade and Don Yaeger. (Sentinel.) The war against the Barbary pirates in 1801.

 

New York Times Best Sellers at ACLS for January 31, 2016

Get the latest NYT Best Sellers at the Allegany County Library System.

FICTION (Combined Print & E-Book)

BLUE, by Danielle Steel. (Delacorte.) A woman whose life has been shattered befriends a homeless boy.

FEVERBORN, by Karen Marie Moning. (Delacorte.) Solving an ancient riddle to prevent the Earth from vanishing on the streets of a dangerously magical Dublin; a Fever novel.

THE CHOICE, by Nicholas Sparks. (Grand Central.) When Travis meets his new neighbor, his bachelor status erodes.

MY NAME IS LUCY BARTON, by Elizabeth Strout. (Random House.) A woman struggles with memories of her impoverished and disturbing childhood and its effect on the present as she attempts to reconcile with her mother.

THE REVENANT, by Michael Punke. (Picador.) Left for dead after a mauling, the master tracker Hugh Glass is consumed by a singular desire for revenge; an inspiration for the 2015 film.

THE BALLER, by Vi Keeland. (Vi Keeland.) After a locker-room interview of a Super Bowl M.V.P., a sportscaster decides to alter her dating rules.

THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN, by Paula Hawkins. (Riverhead.) A psychological thriller set in the environs of London is full of complications and betrayals.

THE NIGHTINGALE, by Kristin Hannah. (St. Martin’s.) Two sisters are separated in World War II France: one in the countryside, the other in Paris.

THE MARTIAN, by Andy Weir. (Crown.) Abandoned by his crew, an astronaut embarks on a dogged quest to stay alive.

THE LAST ANNIVERSARY, by Liane Moriarty. (Harper Perennial.) A family home on an Australian island is bequeathed to an outsider, and the clan’s conflicts come with it.

 

NONFICTION (Combined Print & E-Book)

WHEN BREATH BECOMES AIR, by Paul Kalanithi. (Random House.) A memoir by a physician who received a diagnosis of Stage IV lung cancer at the age of 36.

13 HOURSby Mitchell Zuckoff with members of the Annex Security Team. (Twelve.) Six C.I.A. contract employees discuss their experience during the attack on the State Department compound and the C.I.A. station called the “annex” in Benghazi in 2012.

THE ROAD TO LITTLE DRIBBLING, by Bill Bryson. (Doubleday.) An American expatriate travels around his adopted country.

DARK MONEY, by Jane Mayer. (Doubleday.) An account of how the Koch brothers and other super-wealthy donors deployed their money to change American politics.

BETWEEN THE WORLD AND ME, by Ta-Nehisi Coates. (Spiegel & Grau.) A meditation on race in America as well as a personal story by the Atlantic’s national correspondent.

THE NAME OF GOD IS MERCY, by Pope Francis with Andrea Tornielli. (Random House.) In a conversation with a Vatican reporter, the pontiff explores the cornerstone of his faith.

THE BIG SHORT, by Michael Lewis. (Norton.) The people who saw the real estate crash coming and made billions from their foresight. The basis of the movie.

KILLING REAGANby Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard. (Holt.) The host of “The O’Reilly Factor” recounts the events surrounding the attempted assassination of President Reagan in 1981.

THOMAS JEFFERSON AND THE TRIPOLI PIRATESby Brian Kilmeade and Don Yaeger. (Sentinel.) The war against the Barbary pirates in 1801.

THE BOYS IN THE BOATby Daniel James Brown. (Penguin.) The University of Washington’s eight-oar crew and their quest for gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics.

 

New York Times Best Sellers at ACLS for January 24, 2016

Get the latest NYT Best Sellers at the Allegany County Library System.

FICTION (Combined Print & E-Book)

SCANDALOUS BEHAVIOR, by Stuart Woods. (Putnam.) Stone Barrington seeks a restful stay in the English countryside, but relationships with neighbors complicate matters.

MY NAME IS LUCY BARTON, by Elizabeth Strout. (Random House.) A woman struggles with memories of her impoverished and disturbing childhood and its effect on the present as she attempts to reconcile with her mother.

THE REVENANT, by Michael Punke. (Picador.) Left for dead after a mauling, the master tracker Hugh Glass is consumed by a singular desire for revenge; an inspiration for the 2015 film.

THE SCORE, by Elle Kennedy. (Elle Kennedy.) A newly single graduate finds her attentions turning to a hockey star.

THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN, by Paula Hawkins. (Riverhead.) A psychological thriller set in the environs of London is full of complications and betrayals.

THE MARTIAN, by Andy Weir. (Crown.) Abandoned by his crew, an astronaut embarks on a dogged quest to stay alive.

SEBRING, by Kristen Ashley. (Kristen Ashley.) A schemer finds an outsider like himself, but does she need to be protected from his wiles?

JANUARY, by Audrey Carlan. (Waterhouse.) Mia becomes a high-priced escort to pay off her father’s gambling debts.

THE CHOICE, by Nicholas Sparks. (Grand Central.) When Travis meets his new neighbor, his bachelor status erodes.

THE NIGHTINGALE, by Kristin Hannah. (St. Martin’s.) Two sisters are separated in World War II France: one in the countryside, the other in Paris.

 

NONFICTION (Combined Print & E-Book)

WHEN BREATH BECOMES AIR, by Paul Kalanithi. (Random House.) A memoir by a physician who received a diagnosis of Stage IV lung cancer at the age of 36.

13 HOURSby Mitchell Zuckoff with members of the Annex Security Team. (Twelve.) Six C.I.A. contract employees discuss their experience during the attack on the State Department compound and the C.I.A. station called the “annex” in Benghazi in 2012.

THE NAME OF GOD IS MERCY, by Pope Francis with Andrea Tornielli. (Random House.) In a conversation with a Vatican reporter, the pontiff explores the cornerstone of his faith.

THE RESIDENCE, by Kate Andersen Brower. (Harper.) Fifty years of White House lore, based on interviews with butlers, maids and other staff members.

BETWEEN THE WORLD AND ME, by Ta-Nehisi Coates. (Spiegel & Grau.) A meditation on race in America as well as a personal story by the Atlantic’s national correspondent.

THE BIG SHORT, by Michael Lewis. (Norton.) The people who saw the real estate crash coming and made billions from their foresight. The basis of the movie.

ALEXANDER HAMILTON, by Ron Chernow. (Penguin.) A biography of the first Treasury secretary, a major author of the Federalist Papers and an advocate of strong central government. Originally published in 2004 and the basis of the Broadway play.

KILLING REAGANby Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard. (Holt.) The host of “The O’Reilly Factor” recounts the events surrounding the attempted assassination of President Reagan in 1981.

THOMAS JEFFERSON AND THE TRIPOLI PIRATES, by Brian Kilmeade and Don Yaeger. (Sentinel.) The war against the Barbary pirates in 1801.

THE BOYS IN THE BOATby Daniel James Brown. (Penguin.) The University of Washington’s eight-oar crew and their quest for gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics.

 

New York Times Best Sellers at ACLS for January 17, 2016

Get the latest NYT Best Sellers at the Allegany County Library System.

FICTION (Combined Print & E-Book)

THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN, by Paula Hawkins. (Riverhead.) A psychological thriller set in the environs of London is full of complications and betrayals.

ROGUE LAWYERby John Grisham. (Doubleday.) The attorney Sebastian Rudd is a “lone gunman” who hates injustice and the system and defends unpopular clients.

THE MARTIAN, by Andy Weir. (Crown.) Abandoned by his crew, an astronaut embarks on a dogged quest to stay alive.

JANUARY, by Audrey Carlan. (Waterhouse.) Mia becomes a high-priced escort to pay off her father’s gambling debts.

ALL THE LIGHT WE CANNOT SEE, by Anthony Doerr. (Scribner.) The lives of a blind French girl and a gadget-obsessed German boy before and during World War II.

THE NIGHTINGALE, by Kristin Hannah. (St. Martin’s.) Two sisters are separated in World War II France: one in the countryside, the other in Paris.

STAR WARS: THE FORCE AWAKENS, by Alan Dean Foster. (Lucasbooks.) There are new disturbances in the force in this novelization of the film franchise’s seventh installment.

THE CHOICE, by Nicholas Sparks. (Grand Central.) When Travis meets his new neighbor, his bachelor status erodes.

THE REVENANT, by Michael Punke. (Picador.) Left for dead after a mauling, the master tracker Hugh Glass is consumed by a singular desire for revenge; an inspiration for the 2015 film.

THE LAST ANNIVERSARY, by Liane Moriarty. (Harper Perennial.) A family home on an Australian island is bequeathed to an outsider and the clan’s conflicts and secrets along with it.

 

NONFICTION (Combined Print & E-Book)

BETWEEN THE WORLD AND ME, by Ta-Nehisi Coates. (Spiegel & Grau.) A meditation on race in America as well as a personal story by the Atlantic’s national correspondent.

THE BIG SHORT, by Michael Lewis. (Norton.) The people who saw the real estate crash coming and made billions from their foresight. The basis of the movie.

13 HOURS, by Mitchell Zuckoff with members of the Annex Security Team. (Twelve.) Six C.I.A. contract employees discuss their experience during the attack on the State Department compound and the C.I.A. station called the “annex” in Benghazi in 2012

THOMAS JEFFERSON AND THE TRIPOLI PIRATES, by Brian Kilmeade and Don Yaeger. (Sentinel.) The war against the Barbary pirates in 1801.

KILLING REAGANby Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard. (Holt.) The host of “The O’Reilly Factor” recounts the events surrounding the attempted assassination of President Reagan in 1981.

LADY ALMINA AND THE REAL DOWNTON ABBEY, by the Countess of Carnarvon. (Broadway.) The inspiration and setting for the show on PBS. Originally published in 2011.

THE BOYS IN THE BOATby Daniel James Brown. (Penguin.) The University of Washington’s eight-oar crew and their quest for gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics.

THE WATER IS WIDE, by Pat Conroy. (Open Road.) The author describes a year he spent teaching in a two-room schoolhouse on a remote island off South Carolina. Originally published in 1972.

BEING MORTAL, by Atul Gawande. (Metropolitan/Holt.) The surgeon and New Yorker writer considers how doctors fail patients at the end of life, and how they can do better.

I AM MALALA, by Malala Yousafzai with Christina Lamb. (Little, Brown.) The experience of the Pakistani girl who advocated for women’s education and was shot by the Taliban.

 

New York Times Best Sellers at ACLS for January 10, 2016

Get the latest NYT Best Sellers at the Allegany County Library System.

FICTION (Combined Print & E-Book)

THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN, by Paula Hawkins. (Riverhead.) A psychological thriller set in the environs of London is full of complications and betrayals.

THE MARTIAN, by Andy Weir. (Crown.) Abandoned by his crew, an astronaut embarks on a dogged quest to stay alive.

ROGUE LAWYERby John Grisham. (Doubleday.) The attorney Sebastian Rudd is a “lone gunman” who hates injustice and the system and defends unpopular clients.

ALL THE LIGHT WE CANNOT SEE, by Anthony Doerr. (Scribner.) The lives of a blind French girl and a gadget-obsessed German boy before and during World War II.

POINT BLANK, by Fern Michaels. (Kensington.) The Sisterhood heads to Asia to locate a missing daughter.

THE NIGHTINGALE, by Kristin Hannah. (St. Martin’s.) Two sisters are separated in World War II France: one in the countryside, the other in Paris.

CROSS JUSTICE, by James Patterson. (Little, Brown.) Detective Alex Cross returns home, for the first time in 35 years, to help a cousin who has been accused of murder.

SEE ME, by Nicholas Sparks. (Grand Central.) A couple in love are threatened by secrets from the past.

THE CHOICE, by Nicholas Sparks. (Grand Central.) When Travis meets his new neighbor, his bachelor status erodes.

THE GUILTY, by David Baldacci. (Grand Central.) The government hit man Will Robie investigates murder charges against his estranged father in their Mississippi hometown.

NONFICTION (Combined Print & E-Book)

NOT MY FATHER’S SON, by Alan Cumming. (Dey Street.) The actor’s memoir describes his abusive father and his family’s secrets as well as his experiences in theater, movies and television.

BETWEEN THE WORLD AND ME, by Ta-Nehisi Coates. (Spiegel & Grau.) A meditation on race in America as well as a personal story by the Atlantic’s national correspondent.

THE BIG SHORT, by Michael Lewis. (Norton.) The people who saw the real estate crash coming and made billions from their foresight. The basis of the movie.

THOMAS JEFFERSON AND THE TRIPOLI PIRATES, by Brian Kilmeade and Don Yaeger. (Sentinel.) The war against the Barbary pirates in 1801.

KILLING REAGANby Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard. (Holt.) The host of “The O’Reilly Factor” recounts the events surrounding the attempted assassination of President Reagan in 1981.

WHAT IF?by Randall Munroe. (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.) Scientific (but often funny) answers to hypothetical questions, based in part on the author’s website, xkcd.com.

THE BOYS IN THE BOATby Daniel James Brown. (Penguin.) The University of Washington’s eight-oar crew and their quest for gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics.

WHY NOT ME?, by Mindy Kaling. (Crown Archetype.) More personal essays from the comedian and actress.

MODERN ROMANCE, by Aziz Ansari with Eric Klinenberg. (Penguin Press.) The comedian enlists a sociologist to help him understand today’s dating scene.

BOYS IN THE TREES, by Carly Simon. (Flatiron.) A memoir by the singer.

New York Times Best Sellers at ACLS for January 3, 2016

Get the latest NYT Best Sellers at the Allegany County Library System.

FICTION (Combined Print & E-Book)

ROGUE LAWYERby John Grisham. (Doubleday.) The attorney Sebastian Rudd is a “lone gunman” who hates injustice and the system and defends unpopular clients.

THE MARTIAN, by Andy Weir. (Crown.) Abandoned by his crew, an astronaut embarks on a dogged quest to stay alive.

CROSS JUSTICE, by James Patterson. (Little, Brown.) Detective Alex Cross returns home, for the first time in 35 years, to help a cousin who has been accused of murder.

THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN, by Paula Hawkins. (Riverhead.) A psychological thriller set in the environs of London is full of complications and betrayals.

ALL THE LIGHT WE CANNOT SEE, by Anthony Doerr. (Scribner.) The lives of a blind French girl and a gadget-obsessed German boy before and during World War II.

SEE ME, by Nicholas Sparks. (Grand Central.) A couple in love are threatened by secrets from the past.

THE BAZAAR OF BAD DREAMS, by Stephen King. (Scribner.) Twenty stories, some never before published.

THE GUILTY, by David Baldacci. (Grand Central.) The government hit man Will Robie investigates murder charges against his estranged father in their Mississippi hometown.

THE NIGHTINGALE, by Kristin Hannah. (St. Martin’s.) Two sisters are separated in World War II France: one in the countryside, the other in Paris.

GO SET A WATCHMAN, by Harper Lee. (Harper.) In the mid-1950s, a grown-up Jean Louise Finch returns home to find that her adored father is not as perfect as she believed.

 

NONFICTION (Combined Print & E-Book)

KILLING REAGAN, by Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard. (Holt.) The host of “The O’Reilly Factor” recounts the events surrounding the attempted assassination of President Reagan in 1981.

THOMAS JEFFERSON AND THE TRIPOLI PIRATES, by Brian Kilmeade and Don Yaeger. (Sentinel.) The war against the Barbary pirates in 1801.

HUMANS OF NEW YORK: STORIES, by Brandon Stanton. (St. Martin’s.) Photographs and interviews from the creator of the blog and the book “Humans of New York.”

BETWEEN THE WORLD AND ME, by Ta-Nehisi Coates. (Spiegel & Grau.) A meditation on race in America as well as a personal story by the Atlantic’s national correspondent.

THE BOYS IN THE BOATby Daniel James Brown. (Penguin.) The University of Washington’s eight-oar crew and their quest for gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics.

WHAT IF?by Randall Munroe. (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.) Scientific (but often funny) answers to hypothetical questions, based in part on the author’s website, xkcd.com.

THE WRIGHT BROTHERS, by David McCullough. (Simon & Schuster.) The story of the bicycle mechanics from Ohio who ushered in the age of flight.

WHY NOT ME?, by Mindy Kaling. (Crown Archetype.) More personal essays from the comedian and actress.

THE BIG SHORT, by Michael Lewis. (Norton.) The people who saw the real estate crash coming and made billions from their foresight. The basis of the movie.

DESTINY AND POWER, by Jon Meacham. (Random House.) A biography of George H.W. Bush.

New York Times Best Sellers at ACLS for December 27, 2015

Get the latest NYT Best Sellers at the Allegany County Library System.

FICTION (Combined Print & E-Book)

ROGUE LAWYERby John Grisham. (Doubleday.) The attorney Sebastian Rudd is a “lone gunman” who hates injustice and the system and defends unpopular clients.

ALL THE LIGHT WE CANNOT SEE, by Anthony Doerr. (Scribner.) The lives of a blind French girl and a gadget-obsessed German boy before and during World War II.

SEE ME, by Nicholas Sparks. (Grand Central.) A couple in love are threatened by secrets from the past.

THE BAZAAR OF BAD DREAMS, by Stephen King. (Scribner.) Twenty stories, some never before published.

CROSS JUSTICE, by James Patterson. (Little, Brown.) Detective Alex Cross returns home, for the first time in 35 years, to help a cousin who has been accused of murder.

THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN, by Paula Hawkins. (Riverhead.) A psychological thriller set in the environs of London is full of complications and betrayals.

THE MAGIC STRINGS OF FRANKIE PRESTO, by Mitch Albom. (Harper.) A mystical tale of a guitar genius’s journey through 20th-century music.

THE GUILTY, by David Baldacci. (Grand Central.) The government hit man Will Robie investigates murder charges against his estranged father in their Mississippi hometown.

GO SET A WATCHMAN, by Harper Lee. (Harper.) In the mid-1950s, a grown-up Jean Louise Finch returns home to find that her adored father is not as perfect as she believed.

TOM CLANCY: COMMANDER IN CHIEF, by Mark Greaney. (Putnam.) President Jack Ryan detects a pattern in outbreaks of violence around the world that point to the Russian president, but he must unite the Western allies before he can take action.

 

NONFICTION (Combined Print & E-Book)

KILLING REAGAN, by Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard. (Holt.) The host of “The O’Reilly Factor” recounts the events surrounding the attempted assassination of President Reagan in 1981.

THOMAS JEFFERSON AND THE TRIPOLI PIRATES, by Brian Kilmeade and Don Yaeger. (Sentinel.) The war against the Barbary pirates in 1801.

HUMANS OF NEW YORK: STORIES, by Brandon Stanton. (St. Martin’s.) Photographs and interviews from the creator of the blog and the book “Humans of New York.”

BETWEEN THE WORLD AND ME, by Ta-Nehisi Coates. (Spiegel & Grau.) A meditation on race in America as well as a personal story by the Atlantic’s national correspondent.

THE BOYS IN THE BOATby Daniel James Brown. (Penguin.) The University of Washington’s eight-oar crew and their quest for gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics.

WHAT IF?by Randall Munroe. (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.) Scientific (but often funny) answers to hypothetical questions, based in part on the author’s website, xkcd.com.

THE WRIGHT BROTHERS, by David McCullough. (Simon & Schuster.) The story of the bicycle mechanics from Ohio who ushered in the age of flight.

DESTINY AND POWER, by Jon Meacham. (Random House.) A biography of George H.W. Bush.

WHY NOT ME?, by Mindy Kaling. (Crown Archetype.) More personal essays from the comedian and actress.

SPQR, by Mary Beard. (Liveright.) A concise history of ancient Rome.

 

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